The Big List of Educational Grants and Resources Get a roundup of educational grants, contests, awards, free toolkits, and classroom guides aimed at helping students, classrooms, schools, and communities. Check this page weekly to get the latest updates!

 

Photo of hands at keyboard

NEW! Small Research Grants from Spencer Foundation
Deadline: August 1; November 1, 2017

The Small Research Grant program from the Spencer Foundation supports education research projects with budgets of $50,000 or less. In general, the foundation funds projects that “will contribute to the improvement of education,” and the foundation accepts proposals in several areas of study, including the relationship of education and social opportunity, new civics, instructional resources, organizational learning, and purpose of education. See a list of past winning projects, as well as application details online.
Prize: Grants average about $50,000.
Mockingbird Foundation Music Education Grants
Deadline: August 1, 2017 Continue reading “The Big List of Educational Grants and Resources Get a roundup of educational grants, contests, awards, free toolkits, and classroom guides aimed at helping students, classrooms, schools, and communities. Check this page weekly to get the latest updates!”

Teachers: Summer Reading to Cultivate Your Emotional Resilience Immerse yourself in these books to renew yourself for the coming school year.

 By Elena Aguilar

 

Ever since I was a young child, the long days of summer have been for reading. Early in the morning and late into the night, sitting on a beach or lying on the living room floor, I devoured book after book. Novels took me on the journeys and adventures I yearned for; memoirs connected me with shared humanity. Books made me stronger: They put my sadness and loneliness into perspective, suggested routes around the obstacles in my life, and gave me clues as to how I could not only surmount challenges, but thrive in spite of them. By the end of summer, my literary immersion had renewed me for another school year.

A teacher discusses a project with a small group of students.

Continue reading “Teachers: Summer Reading to Cultivate Your Emotional Resilience Immerse yourself in these books to renew yourself for the coming school year.”

Deeper Learning: A Collaborative Classroom Is Key

What’s ideal when it comes to collaboration in our classrooms? Here’s one coveted scenario: several children gathered at a table engaged in a high-level task, discussing, possibly debating an issue, making shared decisions, and designing a product that demonstrates all this deeper learning.

A photo shot from above of four girls working together at a table.

As teachers, we’d love to see this right out of the gate, but this sort of sophisticated teamwork takes scaffolding. It won’t just happen by placing students together with a piece of provocative text or an engaging task. So how do we begin this scaffolded journey? Here are some steps for supporting students in deep and meaningful collaboration.

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The Search for the Perfect Kindergarten

You’re not alone in this big decision. We’ve tapped the brains of parents and experts to guide you through the process in this multi-part series.

illustration of people in a forest of pencils

 

Many of today’s parents remember their earliest years in school as simple times. They went to the closest public elementary school or to a private school their parents chose. Kindergarten was a rewarding and meaningful experience: Play was encouraged; they made their first real friends; they learned how to tie their shoes.

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Drones Can Be Fun—and Educational

A young boy is standing in an empty cement building. He's playing with a flying, remote-operated drone.

Peering up, a teacher asked me, “What are we going to use it for?” as I flew our shiny new drone up between the umbrellas on the quad, past the roof of the gym, and into the low scattered clouds. The camera projected back to my iPhone, and I could see the newly planted trees in our quad, the only green for miles in the Mondrian concrete grid that is our local community.

The students and teachers in the quad all looked up too, shielding their eyes to see the drone fly. Our custodians pulled up in their cart, and my assistant principal whooped like one of the middle schoolers on my campus.

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Students’ Best Tech Resource: The Teacher Three strategies to make sure your content—not your technology—is your students’ main focus.

A teacher assists groups of students working at computers.

Growth in learning does not typically occur through technology used in isolation. It’s when instructional strategies and human interaction are used simultaneously with digital tools that learning experiences are best seeded for growth.

Consider a student using drill and practice software to learn math skills. Students can easily be distracted from the learning process by the excitement of getting to the reward at the end. And if the student is quickly clicking through the problems to get to that reward, they may not gain much understanding of the intended mathematical goal.

Continue reading “Students’ Best Tech Resource: The Teacher Three strategies to make sure your content—not your technology—is your students’ main focus.”

Life After the Hour of Code

 

Woman sitting outside with her tablet

Whether you are an English teacher, a history teacher, a math teacher, an art teacher, or any other subject area specialist, your students can still incorporate coding into what they are learning. If you’re a math teacher, coding is a natural fit — math skills are essential to programming. You can check out the lessons at Code by Math to see how your students can apply what they are learning in class to a coding challenge. You can even have them go to Khan Academy’s Computer Programming courses. No doubt they are already visiting the site for help with their math homework or as classwork.

Continue reading “Life After the Hour of Code”