Gamifying Your Class to Meet the Needs of All Learners…..

Introduce game dynamics like leveling up and earning badges into your classroom to boost student engagement. By John McCarthy

Illustration showing a computer and various icons connected to games and gameplay.

Playing games is fun. Some people pour hours into games without complaint, whether it’s shooting 200 free throws or completing a guild raid in World of Warcraft over several hours.

You can tap into that kind of engagement through gamification—applying game elements to non-game environments to encourage higher participation and motivation. A simple example is a hotel chain, airline, or credit card reward system, where points earned offer customers perks like free rooms, flights, or upgrades, or other amenities. Continue reading “Gamifying Your Class to Meet the Needs of All Learners…..”

Drones Can Be Fun—and Educational

A young boy is standing in an empty cement building. He's playing with a flying, remote-operated drone.

Peering up, a teacher asked me, “What are we going to use it for?” as I flew our shiny new drone up between the umbrellas on the quad, past the roof of the gym, and into the low scattered clouds. The camera projected back to my iPhone, and I could see the newly planted trees in our quad, the only green for miles in the Mondrian concrete grid that is our local community.

The students and teachers in the quad all looked up too, shielding their eyes to see the drone fly. Our custodians pulled up in their cart, and my assistant principal whooped like one of the middle schoolers on my campus.

Continue reading “Drones Can Be Fun—and Educational”

19 Big and Small Classroom Management Strategies

 

A closeup of a high school girl sitting at a purple desk. She's writing, looking down at her paper. Other students are sitting behind her, slightly blurred.

The year I started teaching seventh- to twelfth-grade English in Minneapolis, Prince launched his song about urban ruin, “Sign o’ the Times.” That song was an apt musical backdrop for the lives of my students, most of whom lived in poverty and challenged me daily. That year also afforded me the opportunity to be assaulted with a stone, two chairs, a Rambo knife, a seventh-grade girl’s weak jab, and dozens of creative swear words. Fortunately, classroom order improved when I learned that successful classroom management depends on conscientiously executing a few big strategies and a lot of little ones.

Continue reading “19 Big and Small Classroom Management Strategies”